Lily’s New Wheels

There are certain specialists we see at Sick Kids that leave us less stressed than others.  I like to think of these as “maintenance” appointments – doctor’s we need to see because there was an issue in the past or things that are just part of life and require some follow-up: our regular pediatrician, opthamology and our yearly visit to the thrombosis clinic.

Thrombosis is usually an easy appointment but we’re happy to go.  During each of Lily’s open heart surgeries, she has developed some sort of blood clot: after her first surgery, it was a deep vein thrombosis in her right leg, and after her second surgery it was a venos thrombosis in her left leg, along with a thrombosis on the tricuspid valve in her heart (that was the very scary one that they found on a Friday afternoon and it had miraculously cleared itself by Monday morning, but not after Lily’s cardiologist basically told us that she could have a pulmonary embolism at any moment).  The thrombosis clinic follows Lily to watch for effects of these clots and to ensure that if there are any (because they can cause problems even years later) that we have a plan in place to deal with that.  The appointment itself is very straight forward,  they measure her legs – both the length and circumference – to ensure that both legs are growing at the same rate; they watch for signs of redness, swelling, cyanosis – any symptoms that show there is an issue.  For a while after they discovered the clot on her tricuspid valve, we had discussions about starting her on a drug called Enoxoparin, which is a blood thinner that Jess and I would have delievered through a daily injection.  Luckily for our nerves, after discussing with cardiology, it was decided that we would start with baby aspirin and as long as everything held steady we would stay with that.  I’m happy to say we’ve never had to revisit the option of Enoxoparin!

After looking through Lily’s medical history, they also asked us last year to do full blood panel to conclusively determine if there was something about Lily’s blood that could be the reason behind these issues.  It took us a year to get the results and it turns out that not only does Lily have an increased Factor VIII (which determines how fast the blood clots – in hemophilia there is a decreased Factor VIII, which means the blood doesn’t clot. Lily has the opposite – her blood clots too quickly), she also has a Factor V Leiden (a mutation of one of the clotting factors).  Both of these combined have pretty much guaranteed that she will face issues with blood clots for the rest of her life.  This, in itself, is not anything terrifying, but just another thing that we have to keep tucked away in the part of our brains we call, “Lily’s Medical Mumbo Jumbo”, because it’s information that is important to have when we’re looking at subsequent surgeries, if she ever needs to go on birth control or even if we ever want to take a flight somewhere. What’s amazing to me is that we can even get this information from a simple blood test (well, simple in theory, not so simple for the poor technician trying to draw Lily’s blood).  It’s like opening a door wide open for us when we don’t know all of Lily’s genetic family medical history.  For us, it’s especially cool, because now we can pass this information along to her birth parents so that it’s something they can be aware of for any of their other children.

We’re slowly leading up to Lily’s next ECHO and cardiology visit.  Sometimes it’s very hard not to start worrying about what may come up and to remind ourselves that we just need to look at Lily to see how well she’s doing.  With the change in her formula she’s clearly gaining weight, and energy. You can tell just by watching her for 10 minutes that she’s no longer content to be a passive participant in her own life. She’s aching to get moving and, as such, has developed quite the streak of independence. She doesn’t want to just sit on our lap and be entertained, she wants to be on the ground, exploring everything. She’s constantly trying to pull herself up and I have no doubt that one morning, sooner rather than later, I’m going to be greeted by a little girl standing in her crib.

So, to harness this new energy, we – along with Lily’s OT, decided that the time was right to try a walker. It took a couple of weeks but a loaner was dropped off at our house this week and they made sure that it fit her properly. We’re going to try it out for a week and then, as long as we’re happy with it, we will out in the order for her own. I would love to say that we strapped her in and she did a loop around the neighbourhood but she did figure out how to take a few steps, which is actually way more than we thought she would immediately get from it. Fingers crossed that with some work and practice she and her new set of wheels will be toddling all around!

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